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Oxymorons are oxymorons

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What is an oxymoron?

An oxymoron is a figure of speech where there appears to be a contradiction. For example, “accidentally on purpose”, where we know that an action was intentionally carried out but devised to look as though it was purely by chance – or what about a “deafening silence”, or an “honest crook” or a “definite maybe” ?

Etymology

The term oxymoron itself can be traced back to a Latinized Greek word, oxymōrum, meaning “sharp-foolish”, so the word oxymoron is itself an oxymoron. It can comprise two words or it can be a longer phrase. However, an oxymoron is not just two words which contrast each other, such as light and dark or good and evil, because the two ideas do not overlap. In an oxymoron there needs to be a clash of two seemingly different meanings in one phrase, which make the reader stop and think. The Merriam -Webster dictionary broad definition is ” something (such as a concept) that is made up of contradictory or incongruous elements.” For example, an “open secret” or “friendly fire”.

Literary Oxymorons

Oxymorons have been used in English literature for centuries, generally for dramatic effect, and to show that two opposing ideas can often paint the picture of a deeper truth. Shakespeare used a whole string of 13 oxymorons to great effect in Romeo and Juliet, to express the complicated nature of love , amongst which are ” brawling love”, “loving hate” and “heavy lightness. And remember the famous line ” parting is such sweet sorrow ” from the same play? John Milton wrote about “darkness visible” in Book 1 of Paradise Lost. The idea of ” warm, scalding coolness” was used by Ernest Hemingway in For Whom the Bell Tolls.

Still used today

But don’t make the mistake of thinking that oxymorons are a dusty relic of the past. Moving on into the twentieth century, remember Simon and Garfunkel’s number one hit The Sound of Silence? Or the Verves’ Bitter Sweet Symphony, from 1997?

Oxymorons are also used to introduce new concepts such as virtual reality and working holiday. They can be used ironically to gain laughs, for example, happily married, affordable caviar, corporate responsibility. And sometimes they can be produced by accident ; see if you can spot the unintended example in the expressions below….

And finally…

Let’s look at at some funny phrases usisng oxymorons which have gained their place in history.

” I can resist anything, except temptation. ” Oscar Wilde

” It takes a lot of time and money to look this cheap.” Dolly Parton

” A joke is a very serious thing.” Winston Churchill

” If I could drop dead right now, I’d be the happiest man alive.” Samuel Goldwyn

” The budget was unlimited, but I exceeded it.” Donald Trump

Which one do you like the most ?

Do you know any others ?

By paulinell

I am an EFL teacher, examiner, Spanish to English translator and English-stuff is my blog on English history, culture and language.

2 replies on “Oxymorons are oxymorons”

Oxymorons fascinate me, great topic, thank you! And those are some really enjoyable quotes; my favourites are the one by Oscar Wilde and Dolly Parton :). Some other oxymorons I can think of are Hell’s Angels, act naturally, pretty ugly…

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